Title Fight’s ‘Shed’ Review & Analysis

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Seven years later, I discover this gem.

‘Shed’ is the debut studio album by Title Fight, well-known for their punk-rock, post-hardcore sounds and melancholic lyrics. The latter of which is exceptional throughout their discography. This review will analyse ‘Shed’ and its themes certain around society and individuals, the band’s rage, confusion and their final perspective. Almost scaling the band’s journey through the intricate workings of the world, you’ll appreciate perpetually.

In short, the answer is a yes, every music lover especially genre lovers should give this band a try. But ‘Hyperview’, their latest album might be a more accessible starting point as ‘Shed’ does take a while to sink into.

Rocking to ‘Hyperview’ since 2015, I never really gave thought to expanding my awareness for the band. It was only the end of 2017 that ‘Floral Green’ was given to me, and now  ‘Shed’. The intro track is what put me off all these years where I reasonably concluded ‘this sound isn’t for me’ — how wrong was I. Upon being fed each baseline, riff, scream, and poetry, I can safely call myself an all around title fight fan.

SHED YOUR SKIN

Throughout the course of the record, several things remained constant. The lyrics were raw and poetic in a way unlike most in the genre. And the atmosphere and rage woven into each strum makes up the larger theme of the album being a reply to society and everything and everyone in it. At times it almost seems to point its fingers like on the title track ‘Shed’ which has one of many thoughtful lines, “Shed your skin, change your face.” The vocals during these lines perfectly carries you then releases, you feel moved. This might come across as an insult to individuals however can too be interpreted as them asking you to genuinely think whether the face you carry is really your own. “Find a better body to fit in” kindly asks you to find yourself, or expects you to jump into another ‘phase’ just like you saw the hardcore punk scene.

‘Crescent-Shaped Depression’ captured me early on, the melancholic yet contemptuous intro was like a drive down a highway in the early morning shouting, “the mountains surrounding”. “Mark the boundaries you’re not meant to leave” concludes to doing so but “only mentally” reminding that limits imposed by society should be noted down, but not lived by. This sound is similar to ‘Floral Green’, perhaps it was this sound that paved the way to a more refined style, where the anger and rage is more concentrated in direction and intensity.

SAFE IN YOUR SKIN

A short and sweet track that only has lyrics sung at the tail-end, by the album’s producer, ‘Walter Schreifels’, earns its place as my pick for the most jarringly-beautiful song on the record. The very fact I can say that despite its ridiculously short length speaks for itself. The intricate chords almost embrace me during each listen, furthered by “When you’re feeling down in Kingston, Maybe we’ll meet again,” referring to the town they grew up in. The transition to ‘Where Am I’ is artfully crafted with a true idea discussed, sung emotionally. ‘Your Screen Door’ has a fresh, morning nostalgic hook, that has one of the greatest endings I have ever heard, each articulate strum and the soft drums at the back gives this track grandeur dimension.

IF I SAID YOUR NAME 27 TIMES
WOULD THAT BRING YOU BACK TO LIFE?

The track, ’27’ speaks of the band’s trials through numerous deaths around them, which as they would later state in several interviews, changed them. Jamie Rhoden and Ned Russin, vocalists, former guitarist, latter bassist, these two are equally carried by Shane Moran (guitar) and Ben Russin (drums).

Finally in an effort to conclude the album, ‘GMT (Greenwich Mean Time)’ features a transition so pulsating and transcending, it really lets you reflect on the entire album as a whole in its unexpectedness and raw emotion flooded with deep words deprived in even the most praised of genre’s. If you are looking to jump into this band I highly suggest listening to their latest album “Hyperview” for those new to the genre, each of their records are different yet still contain the bands’ usual quirks, which only allows me to further appreciate their impact in the scene.

ALL ALONG I’VE HEARD YOUR VOICE.
I HEARD YOUR VOICE AND NOW IT’S GONE.

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